The “C Word”

The word cancer really scares us all, especially when it is your dog. How will you know how he feels? What if she is in pain? There are so many questions, but Dr. Sue Ettinger, cancer vet, helps us know the facts in this episode.

Don’t get scared. Get smart!

Listen free by clicking the link below.

On most podcast players and Spotify.

https://www.petliferadio.com/gonetothedogsep17.html

The 12 Dangers of Christmas (for pets)

We know that Christmas has its own set of wonders, but we also know it has some dangers for pets. Are they what you thought?

1. Mistletoe– Real mistletoe is very toxic to both dogs and cats (as well as humans). If you hang it, make sure it stays out of reach. Symptoms of ingestion can include some very bad signs, like GI upset, cardiac collapse, and erratic behavior. If you think that your pet has eaten mistletoe, go to the animal ER as soon as possible. *Interesting side notePoinsettia often appears on lists like these, but I have NEVER treated a pet for poinsettia ingestion. Either they are very unlikely to actually eat it or it isn’t as toxic as purported. Either way, it could still cause stomach upset, so keep pets away.

2. Sweet Treats– I don’t think that people realize that xylitol (sugar substitute found in many sugar free candies and gum) is toxic to pets. Cats are not likely to eat sweets because they probably cannot taste sweet flavors, so this more of a dog thing. I have seen many canine patients in danger from eating a whole pack of sugar free gum. Fortunately, the owners had all discovered the transgression and rushed in, but I have heard of others who were not so lucky. Holidays pose a risk of exposure to increased temptations, both sweet and sugar free, that are not good for pets. I think that a good rule of thumb is to keep everything not specifically pet-labeled out of reach. As always, remember that chocolate, grapes, and raisins are on the list of foods not suitable for pets.

3. Tinsel-Tinsel, like Easter grass, is a holiday accompaniment that I could cheerfully do without. It doesn’t do our pets any good either. Cats especially find tinsel and grass fascinating and will eat them. The trouble is, as your cat gnaws and plays, those long strands of indigestible, virtually unbreakable, synthetic can become wrapped around the base of the tongue where you would not see it unless you really knew how to check. When its other end is swallowed it cannot pass because it is anchored in the mouth, causing the intestine to bunch up like an elastic waist band. This presents a surgical emergency, and the prognosis worsens if treatment is delayed.

4. Ornaments– Christmas tree ornaments can be enticing for pets to play with. I have surgically removed them from the intestines of several patients. I suggest keeping the tree and other decorations inaccessible to pets when possible. If pets must be unattended during the holidays, it might be wise to confine them to a safe room or crate. Surgical foreign body removal can be economically expensive and medically life threatening. Products are available for teaching pets to avoid danger, however, and a hidden transmitter with a diameter zone can provide invisible protection around the Christmas tree with a humane buzz.

5. Electric cords– Electric cords are interesting to pets, but chewing them causes burns in the mouth and some serious secondary complications, such as fluid in the lungs. You need emergency help if your pet bites an electrical cord.

6. Open doors– Many pets escape and are lost in the dark when doorways are so frequently open for guests. It is always a good idea to microchip your pet, even indoors-only ones. Be SURE to register the chip with an international database and keep your info current. We always encourage our clients to list us as their veterinarian so that if they can’t be reached timely, we can be given the opportunity keep pets safely with us temporarily.

7. Fatty meals-Holidays are festive and in this country they frequently center around meals. Many of the foods that we love for the holidays can serve as a hazard for pets and ANY food can be hazardous to pets in excessive quantities. Post-holiday visits to Applebrook often include cases of pancreatitis. This inflammation of the pancreas, found in both dogs and cats, is not only painful but also life threatening. For dogs especially, acute pancreatitis results from eating high fat meals. Some dog and cat breeds and individuals are predisposed to this problem, and victims seem to be more vulnerable to certain foods than to others (at least in my practice). Pancreatitis is a tricky condition, but it’s largely preventable: just do your best to avoid risk factors.

8. Spices– It often comes as a surprise that what seems like an indulgent treat for a dog or cat may actually be a health hazard. For example, no matter how much you yourself enjoy a nice dish of spaghetti, anything with garlic and onions can harm your pet so resist your inclination to share it.  Abnormal destruction of red blood cells (hemolytic anemia) and gastrointestinal difficulties may be the dangerous, unintended consequence. Since the hard way is the only way to determine how severely your pet could be affected, it is obviously best to withhold garlic and onions completely, even at Christmas.

9. Kids’ toys– Toys that are small or have small parts are always an ingestion risk for pets. Obviously few of these are digestible, so when one lodges in the intestines, it can provoke a surgical emergency. A pet suffering from complete intestinal blockage is usually very sick with multiple incidents of projectile, foul vomiting even when not eating but only drinking water. When your pet can’t hold down clear water, you have an emergency that cannot wait for your vet to return from holiday. Get to the animal ER immediately.

10. Hustle and BustleWith new people, and probably lots of them, both children and adults, joining you during the holidays, your pet is seeing lots of new faces, hearing lots of new voices, and smelling lots of new scents. Some pets don’t like noise, fear strangers, dislike children, or just don’t manage change very well. Try to be sensitive to your pet’s needs. Give him/her a safe place to hide (like a crate or a quiet bedroom) and warn new people to go slowly. Make sure your cat can easily access the litterbox without confronting a crowd; otherwise, you could be asking for “accidents.”

11. Cold weather/frozen water (outdoor pets)- Don’t forget outdoor pets in the chaos of the holidays. Make sure they have fresh (not frozen) water and are appropriately sheltered.

12. Disruption of schedule with meds and potty breaksSome pets require daily or more frequent medications, like insulin or thyroid supplements. Set a reminder on your cell phone or leave a note for yourself so the preparation and merriment don’t cause you to forget or mistime meds. And don’t neglect to walk your dog! Never is exercise and attention more necessary than when the family is distracted and the household disordered.

13. Trash– Keep in mind that a family’s trash is a pet’s treasure, no matter how dangerous. Animals exercise no discretion when it comes to digging for tasty smelling leftovers. Make absolutely certain that ALL the trash is inaccessible to pets.

*Above all, the holidays are a time to enjoy friends and family. As you celebrate loved ones, include those with fur!

How to include pets in Thanksgiving safely

So, my clients all know that I frown on giving “people food” to pets. But I have pets and I know how it is.  We love them and we want to include them on the festivities.  I am going to tell you how to include them and NOT see me in the following days with vomiting/diarrhea and a variety of symptoms known as “dietary indiscretion”.
Choose wisely. If you think that a food item is not the best idea for you, don’t give it to your pet and there are, of course, ingredients that must be avoided for pets specifically, even though they aren’t toxic to us.

Examples might include:

Highly fatty foods, like ground beef or bacon can cause severe disease in some pets, like emergency pancreatitis. Thanksgiving morning brunch with eggs and sausage is not dog friendly!

Chocolate is never a great idea for pets. No onions, garlic, grapes, raisins or bones should be offered to dogs.

I personally avoid highly processed foods, like breads and pastries for my dogs (and myself).

Remember “all things in moderation”. Never give dogs all the leftover mashed potatoes or clean out the fridge on Black Friday dumping all of it on the dog!
Good choices might include giving a green bean or two or maybe a carrot.  Dessert for your dog could be a piece of melon.  My dogs are grateful to be included and are very excited about anything that I give them.  They never stop and look at me like I should have given them something tastier!


Most pets are just happy to have all the excitement and visitors and the treats are secondary.  Pets show us what being thankful is all about and I am thankful for them!

Should My Dog Wear a Coat in Winter?

ASK A VET: SHOULD MY DOG WEAR A COAT IN WINTER?

(written by Kathryn Primm, DVM originally published by http://www.iheartdogs.com)

There are two camps of people in the world, dog people and… everyone else! I am only kidding, but there are people that think dogs are “only animals” and do not need all that we provide for them. For those people I have a thought: our dogs are not wolves and not even wild animals at all. We have taken them into human society and they have adapted to it. This process is domestication.

Domestic pets, especially indoor dwelling ones or those that have been modified by selective breeding, have unique needs akin to the needs of the humans that they share space with. We have bred dogs to depend on us for their needs. No longer are they well equipped to fend for themselves and we have accepted responsibility for them as our friends and companions. They protect our homes and possessions and we provide them with ease of living.

They live with us in the controlled climate that dwellings provide. Their bodies are less adapted to extremes of temperature. There are ways to decide if your dog might benefit from a winter coat. Consider the following guidelines.

Coat characteristics

Dogs with short, slick coats have less insulation factor. If you have a thick coated dog with an undercoat, he is the most adapted for cold, but use your own judgement. If he seems cold to you, who knows him best, he probably is. Hairless varieties, like Chinese Crested Dogs would probably really like to have a coat for any outdoor time in the winter.

Age

If your dog is a senior pet, she may be less tolerant of extremes of temperature and might really appreciate a jacket. If you feel cold, your senior dog probably is too. She is more likely to suffer from age associated disease, as well and may have arthritis or metabolic issues that would make being cold feel even worse.

Health status

Is your dog battling an ongoing illness? If your dog suffers from osteoarthritis, cold temperatures are going to be less comfortable than they might be to another dog. Pets recovering from almost any disease or injury are less able to maintain the best body temperature because their systems are already working hard to recover. These pets will like the warmth of a coat.

Breed

Dogs who have less body fat are more likely to need a little help maintaining the right body temperature. Thin dogs may need a jacket more quickly than normal weight dogs. Certain breeds of dog seem less cold tolerant. Chihuahuas seem to tremble a lot and may be more likely to feel chilled. “Sight hounds” like whippets and greyhounds are naturally lean and have short coats. All of these dogs would be likely to appreciate a winter coat.

The best advice is that your dog is with you most of the time. She is adapted to the conditions that typically are comfortable to you. If you are outside for a period of time and you know that you will want your coat, grab hers too.

 

All dogs have bones. Do you know enough about them to keep your dog safe?

Today’s guest is Dr. David Dycus who is a veterinary orthopedic surgeon. He is a bone specialist! He shares with us what to look for and common issues that our dogs might suffer from. He tells us when we need to get help and what signs are important.

Check it out for free by clicking the link below.

https://www.petliferadio.com/gonetothedogsep11.html